STORY:

If this coffee seems familiar it’s because we actually had it 6 months ago when we contracted the fly crop from Pergamino at the end of 2016. We were contacted by some friends at Ally Coffee to let us know they had just bought some fresh crop from the village. Of course, we were immediately excited and asked for samples to cup. It did not disappoint. This coffee continues to be one of the sweetest, sugary cups we’ve ever tasted. There is a candy like aspect to this coffee...

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Colombia Aponte Village

This extremely complex coffee comes to us from the South of Colombia. The local land owners use their own unique processing method that combines one day of natural fermentation before it continues through normal washing. The result is incredibly dense sugars that allow us to create intense caramelized flavors during roasting. Both organic sweetness, like dates and molasses, & confectionary flavors, such as caramel and toffee, come forward in the beautiful coffee.

Origin: Colombia

Region: Nariño

Farm: Aponte Village

Process: Honey, Raised Bed Dried

Elevation: 2100 meters

Varietal: Caturra, Bourbon

Cup: Molasses, Butter Pecan, Tangerine, Raisin, Juicy

$ 19 .50
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STORY:

If this coffee seems familiar it’s because we actually had it 6 months ago when we contracted the fly crop from Pergamino at the end of 2016.  We were contacted by some friends at Ally Coffee to let us know they had just bought some fresh crop from the village. Of course, we were immediately excited and asked for samples to cup. It did not disappoint. This coffee continues to be one of the sweetest, sugary cups we’ve ever tasted. There is a candy like aspect to this coffee that is unreal. Due to the elevation, it’s also a dense coffee that it allows us to apply an extreme amount of heat during the “sugar browning” phase of roasting, which only accentuates the sweet cup with various caramelizations.

 

APONTE VILLAGE:

There are two factors that makes this Nariño Aponte Village Honey truly special. One is where it comes from. It is produced by the indigenous community of the Inga, located in the village of Aponte deep in the Juanambú canyon. This group belonged to the northernmost part of the Inca Empire, who colonized the south of Colombia in the late XIV century, a bit before the Spanish came. Land here is communal and its population is ruled by a “cabildo”, a group of elders that make sure that their ancestral laws and traditions are upheld.

 

The second reason is the way its processed. Normally, coffee in Colombia is fermented and washed after its picked and de-pulped. In this case, the coffee was dried before being washed. The intense fermentation process that occurs when coffee is dried without washing its mucilage (honey-like substance around the seed), leads to a cup profile of intense ripen red fruit, that reminds us of cherries and strawberries. This process is very delicate, and if done incorrectly or without the proper conditions can lead to vinegar notes and a terrible cup of coffee. Weather in this region is perfect for this type of drying, as the heavy and cold winds that cross the canyon permit an even and fast drying process of the coffee seed, even covered by its mucilage.

-Informational help by Pedro Echevarria (Pergamino)

 

SUGGESTED USE:

We love this coffee on the Kalita Wave. It has a bit of tricky drain time so adjust your grind a touch coarser and use lots of agitation. 25g coffee to 400g of water is our recipe with a 30 second bloom and a finished drain time of 3.5 minutes. Enjoy this one, it’s special.

 

TRANSPARENCY:

Colombia Aponte Village 

Our long time friend and former employee Dean helped us find this coffee. He's pretty much the nicest guy in the industry and it helps that he's super talented as well. We paid $4.05/lb for this coffee green and he cupped it as an 86.75. We bought sixty 69kg GrainPro bags and forty 35kg bricks. When buying coffee from an importer it is rare you will get an exact FOB price from the company but if we do we will post it here.

 

- The Coffee Commodity purchase price was $1.38/lb when we purchased this coffee.

- The Fair Trade Coffee minimum price was $1.60/lb when we purchased this coffee.

 

* We as a company believe transparency is unbelievably important. However, we decided to only list what is shown because we don’t know where to stop. Do we list the amount of coffee lost in roasting due to moisture loss? Should we list our roaster Mark's salary? The warehouse rent? The utilities? The point of listing things above is not to justify what we charge or what we profit, but to give a realistic snapshot of the industry and how Specialty Coffee can be different than other commodity industries. If you have concerns feel free to email us and I’ll write you back when I’m available. 

- Jon

 

**Direct trade for us means we visited, viewed the operation, approved of the ethics and treatment of staff. It also means, we cupped the coffees and they scored to our standards. Then we paid what the coffee was worth, which is always at least double Fair Trade price and usually even more. We then add a premium on top of the price to go towards social projects in the area or give back some how to the community at large to help cultivate a real relationship with the producer and region. It’s not a certification. There is no governing body that decides when something is direct. Direct trade is marketing, and it means something different for all companies, it is widely abused as well as applauded. We can only say what direct trade means to us. 

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