STORY:

Gachatha Farmer Cooperative is made up of about 1150 farmers. Jane Nyawira has managed the wet mill (factory) for over 12 years now. This is rare to see such a long manager and shows that dedication and consistency always help provide a great cup. Located 100 miles north of Nairobi, the cooperative is in the famous coffee growing region of Nyeri. Utilizing the elevation of the Aberdare mountains...

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Kenya Gachatha OT-19

If you have been involved in specialty coffee for the last few years, chances are, you have heard of or tasted the sweet fruit of the Gachatha Farmer Cooperative. Every year this wet mill (factory) produces some of the best Kenya coffee. This lot from outturn 19 lives up to the hype. Enjoy bright stone fruit, berries, black currant, and complex sugars & acidities. Be on the look out for outturn 20 and our peaberry lot from the same cooperative later this year.

Origin: Kenya

Region: Nyeri

Farm: Gachatha Farmer Cooperative

Process: Kenya Washed, Raised-bed Dried

Elevation: 2000 meters

Varietal: SL-28 & SL-34

Cup: Black Currant, Floral, Red Wine, Candied Grapefruit

$ 22
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STORY:

Gachatha Farmer Cooperative is made up of about 1150 farmers. Jane Nyawira has managed the wet mill (factory) for over 12 years now. This is rare to see such a long career as a mill manager and shows that dedication and consistency always help provide a great cup. Located 100 miles north of Nairobi, the cooperative is in the famous coffee growing region of Nyeri. Utilizing the elevation of the Aberdare mountains and water from the Kangunu river. This station has consistently produced incredibly sweet, complex bright coffees and we are continually trying to bring these coffees in.  

KENYA PROCESS:

First cherries are sorted and the underripe and overripe cherries are removed. Once sorting is finished the coffee is de-pulped. This is done by squeezing the bean through a screen and removing the fruit and skin. The coffee is then left to ferment in white ceramic tiled tanks for 24 hours. The coffee is then stirred for a short amount of time and left to ferment for another 24 hours. After two days of dry fermentations, they wash the coffee. Using fresh water, it removes the sticky mucilage that was attached to the beans until the bacteria during fermentation loosened it’s hold. It’s then soaked in water to slightly ferment over night. Next the coffee goes through sorting and density channels, separating lots and then is taken to raised beds to dry. Once it reaches 11.5-12% moisture content, the coffee is taken to conditioning bins to rest until it goes to the dry mill.

 

 

SUGGESTED USE:

We suggest a Kalita Wave for this coffee. Clarity is important and we want you to taste all those vibrant red fruits. Try 25g of coffee to 390g of water. Finish pouring in 3 minutes. After the coffee is done dripping, swirl the decanter a bit to cool the coffee down. Enjoy the crisp juicy nature of the coffee. Legit brunch coffee right here.

 

 

TRANSPARENCY:

Kenya Gachatha OT-19

We worked with Dormans Coffee to help bid on this coffee for us at the NCE. We paid $5.19/lb and cupped it at a 90. We happily contracted forty-two 67 kilo bags. While in Nairobi we happened to run into our friend Joe (Cafe Imports Australia), and he was generous enough to help us import this into the United States.  Cafe Imports saved us a lot of paperwork, time and stress by throwing our coffee on containers they already had coming to the US. Tip your cup to them as well when your sipping this beauty.

 

http://dormanscoffee.com/               

http://www.cafeimports.com/

 

- The Coffee Commodity purchase price was $1.43/lb when we purchased this coffee.

- The Fair Trade Coffee minimum price was $1.63/lb when we purchased this coffee.

 

* We as a company believe transparency is unbelievably important. However, we decided to only list what is shown because we don’t know where to stop. Do we list the amount of coffee lost in roasting due to moisture loss? Should we list our roaster Mark's salary? The warehouse rent? The utilities? The point of listing things above is not to justify what we charge or what we profit, but to give a realistic snapshot of the industry and how Specialty Coffee can be different than other commodity industries. If you have concerns feel free to email us and I’ll write you back when I’m available. 

- Jon

 

**Direct trade for us means we visited, viewed the operation, approved of the ethics and treatment of staff. It also means, we cupped the coffees and they scored to our standards. Then we paid what the coffee was worth, which is always at least double Fair Trade price and usually even more. We then add a premium on top of the price to go towards social projects in the area or give back some how to the community at large to help cultivate a real relationship with the producer and region. It’s not a certification. There is no governing body that decides when something is direct. Direct trade is marketing, and it means something different for all companies, it is widely abused as well as applauded. We can only say what direct trade means to us. 

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