APONTE VILLAGE:

Two factors make this Nariño Aponte Village honey truly special. One reason is where it is made. Located in the village of Aponte deep in the Juanambú canyon, it is produced by the indigenous community of the Inga. This group belonged to the northernmost part of the Inca Empire, who colonized the south of Colombia in the late XIV century, a bit before the Spanish came. The land here is communal...

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Colombia Aponte Village

This will be the fourth harvest we’ve purchased from the Aponte Village in Nariño, Colombia and it continually gets better and better. It is a honey processed coffee that is a great example of clarity that can be found in the method. Deep, cherry complexity with a sweetness like honey and fig finish with a baking spice note reminiscent of cinnamon. This is a coffee for the people made by the people.

Origin: Colombia

Region: Nariño

Farm: Aponte Village

Producer: The Aponte Village Community

Process: Honey and Raised-bed Dried

Elevation: 2100 meters

Variety: Caturra, Bourbon

Cup: Honey, Cherry, Fig, Baking Spice

Size:

12 oz 5 lb
$ 16 .50
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APONTE VILLAGE:

Two factors make this Nariño Aponte Village honey truly special. One reason is where it is made. Located in the village of Aponte deep in the Juanambú canyon, it is produced by the indigenous community of the Inga. This group belonged to the northernmost part of the Inca Empire, who colonized the south of Colombia in the late XIV century, a bit before the Spanish came. The land here is communal, and its population is ruled by a “cabildo,” a group of elders that make sure that their ancestral laws and traditions are upheld.

 

The second reason is the way the coffee is processed. Usually, coffee in Colombia is fermented and washed after its picked and de-pulped. In this case, the coffee was dried before being washed. The intense fermentation process that occurs when coffee is dried without washing its mucilage (honey-like substance around the seed) leads to a cup profile of intense ripe red fruit, that reminds us of cherries and strawberries. This process is very delicate, and if done incorrectly or without the proper conditions can lead to vinegar notes and a terrible cup of coffee. Weather in this region is perfect for this type of drying, as the heavy and cold winds that cross the canyon permit an even and fast drying process of the coffee seed, even covered by its mucilage.

 

Informational help by Pedro Echevarria (Pergamino)

 

 

SUGGESTED USE: 

Wanna know more about how we brew? Then visit our brew methods page cause "this is how we brew it" (think Montell Jordan when reading that last part).

 

FILTER - Kalita Wave
25.5g Coffee : 400g Water 205°F 
~2:30 Drain Time

 

Another fresh crop of Aponte Village Honey has arrived and its just as tasty as ever! This coffee has a smooth rich body with bright fruits that create a nice balance in the Kalita Wave. This Aponte has a more pronounced nuttiness than last year, like milk chocolate covered almonds. This coffee drains pretty fast compared to some of our others. When under-extracted it was pretty tart and vegetal. This coffee does not want to over-extract, but if it tastes bitter and boring, you’ve done it! 

 

 

ESPRESSO - Modbar EP
Brew Temp: 198°F, Line Pressure: ~3.5 bars, Max Pressure: 9 bars, 
Pressure Profile: T0: 4s, T1: 4s, T2: 42s, T3-6: 0s
20g in : ~ 50g out @ ~23 seconds

 

Aponte makes a tasty espresso with or without milk. With milk think strawberries and cream! A great Colombian coffee to showcase as a 1-and-1 or even up to a latte. Tart strawberries with lemon zest and comforting chocolate are forward in this espresso.

 

 

TRANSPARENCY:

Colombia Aponte Village

This is a Relationship Coffee we have been working with Pedro at Pergamino all year. And just like last year, he’s been kind and talented enough to cup through an incredible amount of 8-12 bag micro-lots putting together this macro-lot. He then sent samples our way to approve and blend together, thus creating one lot from Aponte Village. We paid $3.26/lb for this coffee green, and we cupped it as an 86.5. In total, we bought one hundred 69-kilo GrainPro bags. We paid Royal NY to bring in the coffee.

 

- The Coffee Commodity purchase price was $1.01/lb when we purchased this coffee.

- The Fair Trade Coffee minimum price was $1.60/lb when we purchased this coffee.

 

We as a company believe transparency is unbelievably important. However, we decided only to list what is shown here because we don’t know where to stop. Do we list the amount of coffee lost in roasting due to moisture loss? Should we list our roaster Mark's salary? The warehouse rent? The utilities? The point of listing things above is not to justify what we charge or what we profit, but to give a realistic snapshot of the industry and how Specialty Coffee can be different than other commodity industries. If you have concerns feel free to email us and I’ll write you back when I’m available. 

- Jon

 

RELATIONSHIP COFFEE

Relationship Coffee is an initiative we, at Onyx, have purposely created to describe our sourcing and buying practices and how we document them. Certifications like Direct Trade, Fair Trade, and others have impacted the coffee communities in mostly positive ways but also in some negative ways. We find that blanket terms and applying them to a multitude of business models no longer describes what we do.

 

In reality, every company is different, and we wanted to step out from the mold and create a new set of standards that exceeds in every department from quality to transparency to pricing. The growers, exporters, importers, associations, cooperatives, and other entities are always a set of relationships. To be honest, many are our friends as much as they are our producers and partners. We share information, family news, meals, housing, many faiths, and argue politics. Oh, and we love it. Relationship Coffee for Onyx is the mark of an honest exchange ethos that permeates our company, and we hope it encourages the growth of specialty coffee for the future.

 

GOALS

 

  • We visited the farm or cupping lab and listened to the producer/agronomist or head cooperative/association to ascertain better knowledge about the culture and practices.

  • We cupped the coffee, and it scored to our industry-high standards.

  • We do not buy futures or multiple harvests to ensure that what we cupped for that year is what we serve.

  • We do not ask for exclusivity from producers, binding their options.

  • We pay what the coffee is worth. This always is at least double Fair Trade minimum due to the quality we buy, and many times is three to ten times the amount.

  • We do not finance any coffee. Cash flow is just as important as final price. Coffee is paid in full upon delivery, and we pay a percentage up front upon contracting. 

  • We are completely transparent from price to logistics to cupping score, to who we work with buying and shipping coffee.

  • We work to set premiums after a contracted price to incentivize quality and community building. This can be .10¢ - .25¢ extra per pound or community projects such as school supplies in the growing village, sports jerseys, vented chimneys for kitchen fires, etc.

Pairs Well With