STORY:

The Nano Challa Cooperative was founded in 2004 in western Oromia and a small part known as the Gera District. It started as 25 small local farmers. In 2010 they added a washing station to their system. Now the cooperative currently represents over 400 farmers. Producing mostly washed coffees they have become known for beautiful florals...

Read More

Ethiopia Nano Challa

This is the first fresh harvest Ethiopia to arrive for us! We are super excited to offer a coffee from the Nano Challa Cooperative. Immediately upon tasting this coffee we were enamored with the beautiful florals and bergamot notes that powerfully came forward. As it cools, a more complex delicate essence of peach and stone fruit come forward. This is a perfect coffee to kick off many East African coffees we have coming this year. This is not one to miss.

Origin: Ethiopia

Region: Jimma Zone

Farm: Nano Challa Cooperative

Process: Washed & Raised-Bed Dried

Elevation: 1850 Meters

Varietal: Heirloom

Cup: Bergamot, Dried Berries, Peach, Slick & Juicy, Floral

$ 20
Back To Product

STORY:

The Nano Challa Cooperative was founded in 2004 in western Oromia and a small part known as the Gera District. It started as 25 small local farmers. In 2010 they added a washing station to their system. Now the cooperative currently represents over 400 farmers. Producing mostly washed coffees they have become known for beautiful florals, ripe fruit, and bergamot. Nano Challa is in the Jimma Zone which sits in one of the last remaining rainforests in the country. This allows clean uninhabited micro climates that are perfect for diversity and coffee. 

 

ETHIOPIA COOPERATIVES:

Coffee accounts for over 30% of Ethiopia's total export income. Starting in early 2001, the Ethiopian government changed its coffee regulations, allowing coffee grower cooperatives to sell directly to roasters and exporter/importers. Before that time, all coffee had to be sold through the national exchange or the “ECX”, a requirement that resulted in mixing high- and low-quality beans, yielding a uniformly low price. Coffee cooperative unions have been able to negotiate fair agreements with developed countries.

 

Currently we work with two different importers, one cooperative, and an estate led producer in Ethiopia. The result of these changes have been incredible on the quality of coffee. One nice benefit as well has been the deconstruction of flavor profiles within the regions of Ethiopia. Now there are real distinctions of intonate flavors based on geographical regions and processing methods that show true terroir.

 

Ethiopia is one of, if not our favorite producing country. It’s the birthplace of coffee and we think it can hi light the most pure form of coffee you can have.

 

SUGGESTED USE:

Use on your filter bar or as a single origin espresso. Easy to control drain time on pour overs and amazing sugars for espresso. This one is also quite fresh and will only get better a week or two off roast date.

 

TRANSPARENCY:

Ethiopia Nano Challa

This coffee was brought to us by our friends at Red Fox Coffee Merchants. We paid $4.65/lb to Red Fox and bought thirty-two 60kg bags of green coffee. Jon cupped this coffee at a 88.

 

The Coffee Commodity purchase price was $1.38/lb when we purchased these coffees. 

- The Fair Trade Coffee minimum purchase price was $1.60/lb when we purchased these coffees.

 

 

* We as a company believe transparency is unbelievably important. However, we decided to only list what is shown because we don’t know where to stop. Do we list the amount of coffee lost in roasting due to moisture loss? Should we list our roaster Mark's salary? The warehouse rent? The utilities? The point of listing things above is not to justify what we charge or what we profit, but to give a realistic snapshot of the industry and how Specialty Coffee can be different than other commodity industries. If you have concerns feel free to email us and I’ll write you back when I’m available. 

- Jon

 

**Direct trade for us means we visited, viewed the operation, approved of the ethics and treatment of staff. It also means, we cupped the coffees and they scored to our standards. Then we paid what the coffee was worth, which is always at least double Fair Trade price and usually even more. We then add a premium on top of the price to go towards social projects in the area or give back some how to the community at large to help cultivate a real relationship with the producer and region. It’s not a certification. There is no governing body that decides when something is direct. Direct trade is marketing, and it means something different for all companies, it is widely abused as well as applauded. We can only say what direct trade means to us. 

Pairs Well With