STORY:

This refreshing early harvest Konga from Ethiopia came to us by way of Coffee Shrub. They got wind of this coffee from a friend whom owned the washing station and tipped them off to this beautiful lot. We have been looking for high quality early harvest Ethiopias while we wait for our container to arrive. This coffee was grown by many small hold farmers and then was washed at...

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Ethiopia Buufata Konga

This coffee comes from our favorite growing region, Yirga Cheffe. This beautiful Heirloom variety tastes of peach and nectarine with a slight hint of mint tea. A perfect clean, crisp summer coffee that represents some of the best early harvest of East Africa. Try it both hot & iced!

Origin: Ethiopia

Region: Yirga Cheffe

Farm: Many Small Hold Farmers

Washing Station: Buufata Konga

Process: Washed & Raised-Bed Dried

Elevation: 2000 Meters

Varietal: Heirloom

Cup: Floral & Mint, Nectarine, Creamy Black Tea

$ 20 .50
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STORY:

This refreshing early harvest Konga from Ethiopia came to us by way of Coffee Shrub. They got wind of this coffee from a friend whom owned the washing station and tipped them off to this beautiful lot. We have been looking for high quality early harvest Ethiopias while we wait for our container to arrive. This coffee was grown by many small hold farmers and then was washed at the Buufata Konga station. Once washed and milled it was sorted to Grade 1 standards back in Addis Ababa and prepped for export. This is the first of many lots to come from the area and will be a great representation of what we are looking forward to in May-July for Ethiopia.

 

YIRGA CHEFFE:

Yirga Cheffe is one of the most famous and marketed coffee growing regions out there and for good reason. As it stands the region is about 600 square kilometers in size with a population of 200,000 producing 30,000 tons of coffee. Ethiopia, as an agricultural brand, has long understood the value in marketing the region and actually owns the trademark of the name. Distinct high-quality lots are separated based on screen size, defect, micro-climate, and process method and sold as micro-lots within the cooperatives or other marketers/exporters. 

 

I’ve visited Yirga Cheffe for the last three years, and it’s a beautiful area. Small agricultural villages are spread throughout the area are unified through central washing stations. This coffee came from Coffee Shrub importers. We personally have contracted two different lots from Yirga Cheffe as well. When 2017 comes to a close I suspect we’d have offered 4-5 different coffees from the area. 

 

SUGGESTED USE:

This coffee is perfect for an iced pour-over using a Kalita Wave. We use 25g of coffee ground on medium. Then we add 200g of ice cubes into the decanter. Place the Kalita over the decanter and bloom for 30 seconds with 50g of hot water. Split 150g into 3 pours over 2 minutes and remove the Kalita. Swirl the ice and hot coffee until you feel it’s cool and pour the entire contents into a cup. Grab a lawn chair and set it up outside. Obviously, the next step is to fix the guacamole. Peel and mash avocados in a medium serving bowl. Stir in onion, garlic, tomato, lime juice, salt and pepper. Season with remaining lime juice and salt and pepper to taste. Next grab some chips.  Put on a Talib Kweli record and your day is complete.

 

TRANSPARENCY:

Ethiopia Buufata Konga

Amanda at Coffee Shrub was our contact for this beauty. We paid $4.88 per pound to Coffee Shrub and cupped it at 89. We happily contracted thirty 100 lb bags. We have worked with Coffee Shrub for over three years now off and on when we look to buy spot coffee. Pictures are also courtesy of Coffee Shrub when they were visiting and sourcing. Thanks guys!

www.coffeeshrub.com

 

The Coffee Commodity purchase price was $1.38/lb when we purchased these coffees. 

- The Fair Trade Coffee minimum purchase price was $1.60/lb when we purchased these coffees.

 

 

* We as a company believe transparency is unbelievably important. However, we decided to only list what is shown because we don’t know where to stop. Do we list the amount of coffee lost in roasting due to moisture loss? Should we list our roaster Mark's salary? The warehouse rent? The utilities? The point of listing things above is not to justify what we charge or what we profit, but to give a realistic snapshot of the industry and how Specialty Coffee can be different than other commodity industries. If you have concerns feel free to email us and I’ll write you back when I’m available. 

- Jon

 

**Direct trade for us means we visited, viewed the operation, approved of the ethics and treatment of staff. It also means, we cupped the coffees and they scored to our standards. Then we paid what the coffee was worth, which is always at least double Fair Trade price and usually even more. We then add a premium on top of the price to go towards social projects in the area or give back some how to the community at large to help cultivate a real relationship with the producer and region. It’s not a certification. There is no governing body that decides when something is direct. Direct trade is marketing, and it means something different for all companies, it is widely abused as well as applauded. We can only say what direct trade means to us. 

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