STORY:

We are proud to continue our work with Rigoberto Herrera, third generation Colombian farmer and owner of Café Granja La Esperanza, and to offer this awesome Honey Gesha from Las Margaritas. Las Margaritas is a small, experimental farm that consistently produces high caliber coffees. They pay their pickers by the day, not by quantity of coffee...

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Colombia Las Margaritas Gesha

We are proud to continue our work Café Granja La Esperanza, and to offer this awesome Honey Gesha from Las Margaritas. Las Margaritas is a small, experimental farm that consistently produces high caliber coffees. They pay their pickers by the day, not by quantity of coffee picked. This, combined with attention to detail during the processing period, is evident in every cup. This coffee is so sweet we named our new kitten after it. We actually have used his coffee in multiple competitions over the years with great success. Rigoberto has a extremely keen mind for coffee innovation and continually produces one of the best cups in Colombia.

THIS COFFEE IS UNIQUE. WE WILL BE ROASTING AND SHIPPING THIS COFFEE ON MONDAYS ONLY. ANY ORDERS WITH THIS COFFEE PLACED AFTER 8AM ON MONDAY WILL BE SHIPPED THE FOLLOWING WEEK.

Origin: Colombia

Region: Valle de Cauca

Farm: Las Margaritas

Process: Honey

Elevation: 1850 meters

Varietal: Gesha

Cup: Jasmine, Floral Honey, Berries, Cacao

$ 36
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STORY:

We are proud to continue our work with Rigoberto Herrera, third generation Colombian farmer and owner of Café Granja La Esperanza, and to offer this awesome Honey Gesha from Las Margaritas. Las Margaritas is a small, experimental farm that consistently produces high caliber coffees. They pay their pickers by the day, not by quantity of coffee picked. This, combined with attention to detail during the processing period, is evident in every cup. This coffee is so sweet we named our new kitten after it. We actually have used his coffee in multiple competitions over the years with great success. 

 

HONEY PROCESSED:

Honey Process is a industry term for the look and texture of the coffee while it’s drying. In what is considered a normal fully washed coffee, cherries are pulped and then fermented to remove the mucilage that clings to the parchment or outer shell of the bean. Recently, more producers are taking an approach of adjusting their de-pulper to leave purposeful amounts of mucilage intact on the bean.  Then the coffee is put out immediately to dry instead of fermenting before hand. These coffees dry with the mucilage intact leaving a fruit-forward, sugar dense, sticky residue that covers the coffee. If done properly the cup ends up being extremely sweet and syrupy. We also tend to see an increase in the body and weight of the coffee. It takes meticulous planning and an eye for detail to not over-dry or under-dry these coffees. If that happened, the end result would be mold, ferment, or other defects which would render the coffee un-exportable. Rigoberto has been taking risks since he opened Las Margaritas with varietals, labor pay and other avenues to increase quality. His Honey Process is no exception to is commitment to cup quality and innovation.

  

SUGGESTED USE:

We love this coffee on the Kalita Wave. It has a bit of tricky drain time so adjust your grind a touch coarser and use lots of agitation. 25g coffee to 400g of water is our recipe with a 30 second bloom and a finished drain time of 3.5 minutes. This one will exude an extremely sweet & floral upfront flavor.  

 

TRANSPARENCY:

Colombia Las Margaritas Gesha

This is a direct trade coffee from our friends at Café Granja La Esperanza. We have been working with Granja and Rigoberto for four years now. We paid $18/lb for this coffee, which we cupped as a 90. We used Royal NY to import the container and we bought four 12.5kg Vac Packs of green coffee.

 

- The Coffee Commodity purchase price was $1.45/lb when we purchased this coffee.

- The Fair Trade Coffee minimum price was $1.65/lb when we purchased this coffee.

 

* We as a company believe transparency is unbelievably important. However, we decided to only list what is shown because we don’t know where to stop. Do we list the amount of coffee lost in roasting due to moisture loss? Should we list our roaster Mark's salary? The warehouse rent? The utilities? The point of listing things above is not to justify what we charge or what we profit, but to give a realistic snapshot of the industry and how Specialty Coffee can be different than other commodity industries. If you have concerns feel free to email us and I’ll write you back when I’m available. 

- Jon

 

**Direct trade for us means we visited, viewed the operation, approved of the ethics and treatment of staff. It also means, we cupped the coffees and they scored to our standards. Then we paid what the coffee was worth, which is always at least double Fair Trade price and usually even more. We then add a premium on top of the price to go towards social projects in the area or give back some how to the community at large to help cultivate a real relationship with the producer and region. It’s not a certification. There is no governing body that decides when something is direct. Direct trade is marketing, and it means something different for all companies, it is widely abused as well as applauded. We can only say what direct trade means to us. 

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