STORY:

La Ondulada is Jesús’s farm located in the San Pedro de Cartago Municipality on the Buenos Aires side. His farm is the highest coffee farm we have seen in the area, sitting at an incredible 2035 meters above sea level. At just about two hectares he farms over seven thousand coffee shrubs. He washes his coffee by fermenting for 24 hours and owns parabolic raised beds for optimal moisture control....

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Colombia Jesús Muñoz

This is our second year to buy from Jesús Muñoz. He has the highest elevation farm growing Caturra we have seen in Nariño. You'll find that strong notes of peach and sweet tea come to the forefront of this cup. And a juicy mouthfeel also resides giving a silky-light, fresh finish.

Origin: Colombia

Region: Nariño

Farm: La Ondulada

Process: Washed, Raised-bed Dried

Elevation: 2035 meters

Varietal: Caturra, Bourbon, Colombia

Cup: Peach, Panela, Pineapple, Sweet Tea

$ 17
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STORY:

La Ondulada is Jesús’s farm located in the San Pedro de Cartago Municipality on the Buenos Aires side. His farm is the highest coffee farm we have seen in the area, sitting at an incredible 2035 meters above sea level. At just about two hectares he farms over seven thousand coffee shrubs. He washes his coffee by fermenting for 24 hours and owns parabolic raised beds for optimal moisture control.

 

On a side note, Jesús is also an avid cyclist. Not only is it one of his passions, but we were just told after our last visit that he won several amateur races in Nariño. 

 

VISITING NARIÑO:

My last visit to Nariño was great. But I will say, flying to Nariño is straight up crazy. I’m usually coming from Medellín after visiting our friend Pedro Echavarria, owner of Pergamino Coffee Exporters and Pergamino Café. The airstrip to land on is along a 3000 meter-high sheered mountain terrace. When I was boarding the small prop plane, even the locals seemed anxious, and the captain lets us know it may take 2-3 “attempts” to land. After arriving, we began a 3-hour drive through the most breathtaking ravines and mountain ranges I've seen in Colombia.

 

Once arrived, we met with the head of FUDAM, Roquel, a new association we are working with. I started to hear not only their story but also planning the trip to the farms we were visiting. Roquel is an incredibly kind and driven woman who has spearheaded the quality over quantity push in her area. There are 350 producers within the Association, and together with Pergamino and like-minded roasters, they managed to raise money for new depulpers and African raised-beds for 20% of the association. The depulpers and raised-beds help clean up the processing of coffee. This is a substantial effort that raises the price and quality of coffee in the area. She also leads a pointed focus of helping women producers in the area which now make up 30% of the association. Overall she’s a badass, and we are totally stoked to be working with her.

 

SUGGESTED USE:

This coffee is easy to brew, very extractable, and incredibly sweet and full in the final cup. I suggest brewing this coffee on a Clever Dripper or on your standard coffee brewing machine/batch brew.

 

For the Clever Dripper, try 24 grams to 400 grams. Bloom with 60 grams of water and stir. Then pour tiny, heavy circles into the center of the bed lifting the coffee up to the 400-gram target. You'll be done pouring by 1:15. Then, drain the coffee at 2:45. It should take about 1:15 to drain, giving you a 3:00 total brew time! Look for citrus/brown sugar sweetness, and a juicy mouthfeel.

 

Try this coffee in a pour-over, or French Press as well!

 

TRANSPARENCY:

Colombia Jesús Muñoz

This is a Relationship Coffee from La Ondulada and Jesús Muñoz. This was exported by our friend Pedro Echavarria of Pergamino Coffee Exporters. We paid $3.35/lb for this coffee green, and we cupped it as an 87. We bought twelve 150 pound bags.

 

- The Coffee Commodity purchase price was $1.28/lb when we purchased this coffee.

- The Fair Trade Coffee minimum price was $1.60/lb when we purchased this coffee.

 

* We as a company believe transparency is unbelievably important. However, we decided only to list what is shown here because we don’t know where to stop. Do we list the amount of coffee lost in roasting due to moisture loss? Should we list our roaster Mark's salary? The warehouse rent? The utilities? The point of listing things above is not to justify what we charge or what we profit, but to give a realistic snapshot of the industry and how Specialty Coffee can be different than other commodity industries. If you have concerns feel free to email us and I’ll write you back when I’m available. 

- Jon

 

RELATIONSHIP COFFEE

Relationship Coffee is an initiative we, at Onyx, have purposely created to describe our sourcing and buying practices and how we document them. Certifications like Direct Trade, Fair Trade, and others have impacted the coffee communities in mostly positive ways but also in some negative ways. We find that blanket terms and applying them to a multitude of business models no longer describes what we do.

 

In reality, every company is different, and we wanted to step out from the mold and create a new set of standards that exceeds in every department from quality to transparency to pricing. The growers, exporters, importers, associations, cooperatives, and other entities are always a set of relationships. To be honest, many are our friends as much as they are our producers and partners. We share information, family news, meals, housing, many faiths, and argue politics. Oh, and we love it. Relationship Coffee for Onyx is the mark of an honest exchange ethos that permeates our company, and we hope it encourages the growth of specialty coffee for the future.

 

GOALS

 

  • We visited the farm or cupping lab and listened to the producer/agronomist or head cooperative/association to ascertain better knowledge about the culture and practices.

  • We cupped the coffee, and it scored to our industry-high standards.

  • We do not buy futures or multiple harvests to ensure that what we cupped for that year is what we serve.

  • We do not ask for exclusivity from producers, binding their options.

  • We pay what the coffee is worth. This always is at least double Fair Trade minimum due to the quality we buy, and many times is three to ten times the amount.

  • We do not finance any coffee. Cash flow is just as important as final price. Coffee is paid in full upon delivery, and we pay a percentage up front upon contracting. 

  • We are completely transparent from price to logistics to cupping score, to who we work with buying and shipping coffee.

  • We work to set premiums after a contracted price to incentivize quality and community building. This can be .10¢ - .25¢ extra per pound or community projects such as school supplies in the growing village, sports jerseys, vented chimneys for kitchen fires, etc.

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