STORY:

We are proud to continue our work with Rigoberto Herrera, third generation Colombian farmer and owner of Café Granja La Esperanza, and to offer this awesome washed Gesha from Cerro Azul. Cerro Azul is one of the most unique farms because it has 30,000 Gesha trees planted in a perfect micro climate for growing specialty coffee. The coffee is part of the Rainforest Alliance...

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Colombia Cerro Azul Gesha

Nestled in the mountains of Colombia stands one of the highest quality coffee farms in the world, Cerro Azul. It is a farm where not only is Gesha is the only varietal planted but also it is shaded by the natural rain forest and is washed and dried on site. This is an extremely special coffee that showcases intense florals and tropical fruits. Enjoy literally one of the best coffees in the world.

THIS COFFEE IS UNIQUE. WE WILL BE ROASTING AND SHIPPING THIS COFFEE ON TUESDAYS ONLY. ANY ORDERS WITH THIS COFFEE PLACED AFTER 8AM ON TUESDAY WILL BE SHIPPED THE FOLLOWING WEEK.

Origin: Colombia

Region: Valle del Cauca

Farm: Cerro Azul

Process: Washed & Greenhouse Dried

Elevation: 1850 meters

Varietal: Gesha

Cup: Jasmine, Raspberries, Honeysuckle, Juicy & Creamy, Brown Sugar

$ 69
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STORY:

We are proud to continue our work with Rigoberto Herrera, third generation Colombian farmer and owner of Café Granja La Esperanza, and to offer this awesome washed Gesha from Cerro Azul. Cerro Azul is one of the most unique farms because it has 30,000 Gesha trees planted in a perfect micro climate for growing specialty coffee. The coffee is part of the Rainforest Alliance and it utilizes natural rainforest for shade coverage, while producing some of the best coffees in the world.

 

THE GESHA VARIETAL:

Bergamot, tropical, jasmine, floral, dark fruits, perfumed, lactic, creamy, tea-like, mouthwatering…These are just some of the notes that are attributed to the world's most prized coffee varietal. Born out of Ethiopia and perfected in Panama, the Gesha varietal has put coffee in a new light among croppers, roasters, and connoisseurs. Since its popularity has grown, we have seen the price sky rocket and hundreds of producers from every coffee producing country have started planting the famous varietal. It actually performs poorly in low altitudes but when it’s harvested at 1600 meters or higher it thrives in a unique way. With high amounts of organic acids, sugars, and fats it seems to produce the best of what coffee can offer.

 

SUGGESTED USE:

We love this coffee on the Kalita Wave. It has a bit of tricky drain time so adjust your grind a touch finer and use lots of agitation. Our recipe is 26g of coffee to 400g of water with a 30 second bloom and a finished drain time of 3:15 minutes. This one will exude an extremely sweet & floral upfront flavor.

 

TRANSPARENCY:

Colombia Cerro Azul Gesha

This is a direct trade coffee from our friends at Café Granja La Esperanza. We have been working with Granja and Rigoberto for four years now. We paid $31.19/lb for this coffee, which we cupped as a 90.75. We used Royal NY to import the coffee and we bought four 12.5kg vacuum packs of green coffee.

 

- The Coffee Commodity purchase price was $1.37/lb when we purchased this coffee.

- The Fair Trade Coffee minimum price was $1.60/lb when we purchased this coffee.

 

* We as a company believe transparency is unbelievably important. However, we decided to only list what is shown because we don’t know where to stop. Do we list the amount of coffee lost in roasting due to moisture loss? Should we list our roaster Mark's salary? The warehouse rent? The utilities? The point of listing things above is not to justify what we charge or what we profit, but to give a realistic snapshot of the industry and how Specialty Coffee can be different than other commodity industries. If you have concerns feel free to email us and I’ll write you back when I’m available. 

- Jon

 

**Direct trade for us means we visited, viewed the operation, approved of the ethics and treatment of staff. It also means, we cupped the coffees and they scored to our standards. Then we paid what the coffee was worth, which is always at least double Fair Trade price and usually even more. We then add a premium on top of the price to go towards social projects in the area or give back some how to the community at large to help cultivate a real relationship with the producer and region. It’s not a certification. There is no governing body that decides when something is direct. Direct trade is marketing, and it means something different for all companies, it is widely abused as well as applauded. We can only say what direct trade means to us. 

 

 

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