METAD'S STORY:

METAD is a third-generation family owned business with a rich history. Their story began after World War II when the Ethiopian emperor awarded Muluemebet Emiru, the first African female pilot and family matriarch, with land in the Guji and Sidama zones. That land has become the Hambela Coffee Estate. Today METAD is run by the Adinew brothers, Aman, Tariku, and Michael. Managed by Aman Adinew...

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Ethiopia Chelbesa

This coffee comes fresh from the Gedeb District in southern Ethiopia. Seven hundred small land-owning farmers sold their fruit to a cooperative mill owned by our friends METAD (owners of the famed Hambela farm). While traveling through Addis Ababa earlier this Spring, we stopped at the METAD cupping lab for two days of cupping and sourcing. This specific coffee stood out with its incredible floral sweetness and long black tea finish. It is a perfect coffee for the transition from summer to fall, reminiscent of the fresh flowers turning into fall spice and brown sugars.

Origin: Ethiopia

Region: Gedab

Farm: Chelbesa Washing Station

Producer: Small-hold Farmers

Process: Washed & Raised-bed Dried

Elevation: 1950 meters

Variety: Heirloom

Cup: Vanilla, Bergamot, Floral, Fresh Berries

Size:

12 oz 5 lb
$ 20
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METAD'S STORY:

METAD is a third-generation family owned business with a rich history. Their story began after World War II when the Ethiopian emperor awarded Muluemebet Emiru, the first African female pilot and family matriarch, with land in the Guji and Sidama zones. That land has become the Hambela Coffee Estate. Today METAD is run by the Adinew brothers, Aman, Tariku, and Michael. Managed by Aman Adinew, who returned to Ethiopia after many years working abroad at the executive level for multiple fortune 500 companies because he wanted to make a difference for his family and community. Through Aman’s leadership, METAD has strengthened the local community with employment opportunities including a workforce that is over seventy percent women, educational opportunities including university scholarships and sponsorship for a state-of-the-art elementary school with more than 700 students, and healthcare for employees. METAD was also first to partner with Grounds for Health in Ethiopia to implement a successful cervical cancer screening program for women within the coffee growing communities. METAD has an expanding out-grower program designed to provide technical assistance, share modern farming equipment, and offer certification programs for more than 5,000 local farmers who are paid premiums for their cherry and second payments after coffee is sold. Quality and certification premiums have also helped METAD build roads and community centers. METAD has the first and only private state-of-the-art SCAA certified coffee quality control lab on the African continent used to train both domestic and international coffee professionals.  

 

 

WASHED PROCESS:

The washed process begins with coffee cherries delivered to the washing station, both from the primary market or farmers bringing coffee directly to the mill. The cherries are inspected, and an initial quick round of hand sorting separates some of the defective coffees before placing them into the hopper. They then funnel to the disc pulper to remove the fruit from the seeds (beans). Once pulled, the coffee is fermented under water for approximately 36 hours, with the water drained and refreshed once in that cycle. Then, the parchment is emptied into the washing channels, where it is agitated with rakes. During this step, the water is refreshed twice. Once the washing is complete, the coffee undergoes the traditional “double wash,” where it rests in the soaking tank for another 12 hours, before being taken to the raised drying tables for sun drying.

 

 

SUGGESTED USE:

Wanna know more about how we brew? Then visit our brew methods page cause "this is how we brew it" (think Montell Jordan when reading that last part).

 

FILTER - Hario V60
15g Coffee : 250g Water 202°F 
~2:20 Drain Time

 

This Ethiopia Chelbesa is sweet and fragrant! Sorry for yelling there, sometimes we get overexcited. The V60 brings out bright berries and florals that shine with the vanilla in aroma and flavor. This is an exceptional example of a Gedeb coffee, as a washed coffee the flavors are crisp and transition smoothly throughout the cup experience. If under-extracted, the coffee was still good, but tasted diluted, and became slightly vegetal as it cooled. If over-extracted, the coffee lost some sweetness, becoming unpleasantly drying and bitter.

 

 

ESPRESSO - Modbar EP
Brew Temp: 198°F, Line Pressure: ~3.5 bars, Max Pressure: 9 bars, 
Pressure Profile: T0: 4s, T1: 4s, T2: 42s, T3-6: 0s
19g in : ~ 45g out @ ~25 seconds

 

As an espresso, there are sweet berries with earl grey and tons of florals. This was a sweet and complex espresso that tasted great black and in milk. The flavors carried well throughout a variety of milk beverages and is a great way to add some adventure to traditional milk beverages. When under-extracted this was a salt bomb! Very tart and salty. When over-extracted it was quite boring, but still had some nice berry notes.

 

 

TRANSPARENCY:

Ethiopia Chelbesa

This is a Relationship Coffee from our friends at METAD. We have now traveled to and purchased from METAD in Ethiopia for the last five years. We have an incredible amount of respect for their operation and the quality of their coffee. We bought this lot for $4.60 per pound and purchased thirty 69-kilo bags. We cupped this coffee at an 89.25. Royal Coffee on the west coast brought the coffee into the states along with all our other METAD coffees. Overall we purchased nine micro-lots and over 200 bags of coffee from METAD and the Adinews.


Watch this great video about the work that METAD does. You might see some Onyx people in it. ;)

 

- The Coffee Commodity purchase price was $1.08/lb when we purchased this coffee.

- The Fair Trade Coffee minimum price was $1.60/lb when we purchased this coffee. 

 

We as a company believe transparency is unbelievably important. However, we decided only to list what is shown here because we don’t know where to stop. Do we list the amount of coffee lost in roasting due to moisture loss? Should we list our roaster Mark's salary? The warehouse rent? The utilities? The point of listing things above is not to justify what we charge or what we profit, but to give a realistic snapshot of the industry and how Specialty Coffee can be different than other commodity industries. If you have concerns feel free to email us and I’ll write you back when I’m available. 

Jon

 

Relationship Coffee

Relationship Coffee is an initiative we, at Onyx, have purposely created to describe our sourcing and buying practices and how we document them. Certifications like Direct Trade, Fair Trade, and others have impacted the coffee communities in mostly positive ways but also in some negative ways. We find that blanket terms and applying them to a multitude of business models no longer describes what we do.

 

In reality, every company is different, and we wanted to step out from the mold and create a new set of standards that exceeds in every department from quality to transparency to pricing. The growers, exporters, importers, associations, cooperatives, and other entities are always a set of relationships. To be honest, many are our friends as much as they are our producers and partners. We share information, family news, meals, housing, many faiths, and argue politics. Oh, and we love it. Relationship Coffee for Onyx is the mark of an honest exchange ethos that permeates our company, and we hope it encourages the growth of specialty coffee for the future.

 

GOALS

  • We visited the farm or cupping lab and listened to the producer/agronomist or head cooperative/association to ascertain better knowledge about the culture and practices.

  • We cupped the coffee, and it scored to our industry-high standards.

  • We do not buy futures or multiple harvests to ensure that what we cupped for that year is what we serve.

  • We do not ask for exclusivity from producers, binding their options.

  • We pay what the coffee is worth. This always is at least double Fair Trade minimum due to the quality we buy, and many times is three to ten times the amount.

  • We do not finance any coffee. Cash flow is just as important as the final price. Coffee is paid in full upon delivery, and we pay a percentage up front upon contracting. 

  • We are completely transparent from price to logistics to cupping score, to who we work with buying and shipping coffee.

  • We work to set premiums after a contracted price to incentivize quality and community building. This can be .10¢ - .25¢ extra per pound or community projects such as school supplies in the growing village, sports jerseys, vented chimneys for kitchen fires, etc.

 

Pairs Well With